Skip to main content

Using Personal Stories to Encourage Good Behavior

By Earlene Coleman, Special Education M.A.


After teaching Special Education for twenty-five years, I've found that sharing personal stories with my students helps build positive relationships.

How NOT to be around your students

Now that the school year is off to a start, teachers are busy getting to know all their students. However, spend some time letting your students learn about you. Tell them about where you grew up, your family, about your children, your favorite ice cream, and what your hobbies are. Maybe tell them about what type of child you were. 

One year, I recall describing in detail how I had a tantrum on my mother because I couldn’t go outside to play with my friends when she wanted me to do my chores. All my students thought it was very funny and shared what makes them act out. This sharing was beneficial. Remember, at the beginning of the school year, you are a stranger to most of your class. These conversations will help build positive relationships with students that will pay off later.

Therefore, let your students know you are will to be understanding, calm, and patient like many of their parents. This can prevent many future classroom disruptions. Do not think your students are miniature adults. They do not have experience in dealing with their emotions. You will see some tantrums but if you react appropriately, consistently, and let them know you went through the same things they are when you were younger, the disruptions will diminish or stop altogether.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Putting the E in STEAM

By Amanda Amburgey M.A, Maker Science Teacher, Bulldog Tech 


What is going on in this classroom? There are kids everywhere excitedly making, testing, remaking, retesting, hot gluing, hammering, there is so much duct tape!  This is what engineering looks like in a middle school science class.   This is excited, meaningful learning.  How did I get to this place where I feel comfortable facilitating such an active engineering process with my classes?  As a science teacher I have had practice with hands on, inquiry based labs, technology and math makes their way into those labs easily.  But, engineering had me stumped.  How was I going to be an effective engineering teacher as required with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) when I knew so little about engineering?  
This is where RAFT and their STEM workshops really saved me and gave me the courage to start engineering projects.  I started with a somewhat common misconception of what engineers do.  I thought engineering was going…

CUSD Shares Possible STEAM Projects by Grade

Twelve STEAM Innovation Leaders from the Campbell Unified School District (CUSD) came to RAFT earlier this month to create new motivational activities for the start of the school year!  They met in grade-level teams with our RAFT Education staff to generate new ideas using RAFT materials that will motivate, challenge, and inspire their students. Each team was given a RAFT Makerspace-in-a-Box containing a wide variety of upcycled materials. They were asked to create a Design Challenge that directed students to solve the instructor’s challenge with the materials from the box. The Design Challenges addressed an engineering standard appropriate for each grade level and could include standards from other subjects. Here are some of their exciting back-to-school ideas:
************************************************************************************* Grades TK – 2 Engineering Standard: K-2-ETS1-1:  Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to chan…

The "RAFTy" Teacher Checklist - 5 Things to do to Prepare for Back to School